Battling, Treating and Beating Ulcerative Colitis

Daniel Stein, MD, director of our Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program, and Kirk Ludwig, MD, chief of colorectal surgery, were guests on CTSI Discovery Radio. They discussed a new medication and a successful surgical procedure for treating ulcerative colitis.

Listen Now

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are both types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD affects an estimated 1.6 million Americans. Caucasians are more likely to be affected by IBD compared to other ethnic groups, though African Americans and Hispanics are becoming increasingly affected.

IBD symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloody stools, anemia, fatigue and weight loss. IBD can also lead to symptoms outside of the digestive tract such as eye inflammation, skin rashes, joint pain, mouth ulcers and kidney stones.

Though the exact cause of IBD is not known, we believe it is related to a combination of genetics and environment. The disease is driven by an abnormal immune response that causes damage to the lining of the digestive tract. 

Largest IBD Program in Southeastern Wisconsin

In our Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program, we see more than 2,000 Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients in our clinics every year — making us the largest IBD center in southeastern Wisconsin.

As an academic medical center, our team can focus exclusively on Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Only the academic environment allows this degree of specialization and state-of-the-art care for IBD patients.

Our team includes gastroenterologists, physicians assistants, nurses and a dedicated registered dietitian who work solely with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis patients. We help to verify insurance benefits and provide pharmacist support to ensure your therapies are safe and effective. This approach draws patients from all over the country and allows us to provide a customized approach to every patient we see.

New and Improved IBD Treatment

Our program offers new and improved therapy for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis that other centers in the region do not routinely offer. And we do not stop at commercially available therapy for IBD — we are actively investigating new therapies through clinical trials for our patients who have failed common treatments. Additionally, we have a one of a kind multi-disciplinary meeting every month to determine the care for our most complex patients; drawing on the expertise from surgeons, radiologists, pathologists and gastroenterologists.

Transitioning from Pediatric to Adult IBD Care

If you were diagnosed with IBD as a child or teen, your parents have likely helped manage your care. As you turn 18 or move away from home, you need to start managing your care on your own. You may be worried about dealing with IBD in college and wondering about college accommodations for Crohn's disease and colitis.

Our Inflammatory Bowel Disease Transition Clinic is here to help you do that. Our team works with you and your pediatric specialists to manage your medication, find care away from home and address any challenges you face.

Research to Improve Medical Treatments

In the IBD program, patient care and research are intertwined. We work with you to collect data that will help other patients. All data is confidential and anonymous. No other facility in Wisconsin is conducting IBD research routinely for the benefit of patients. Patients come to the IBD program for treatment from throughout Wisconsin, the nation and abroad.

We perform ground-breaking research in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis treatment. Until a few years ago, the treatment of Crohn’s and colitis was very limited, but the research and development of new therapies have led to exciting new treatments for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. 

High Performing

Froedtert Hospital is recognized by U.S. News & World Report as high performing in four adult specialties and six procedures and conditions, including gastroenterology and GI surgery.
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